Achtung:

Sie haben Javascript deaktiviert!
Sie haben versucht eine Funktion zu nutzen, die nur mit Javascript möglich ist. Um sämtliche Funktionalitäten unserer Internetseite zu nutzen, aktivieren Sie bitte Javascript in Ihrem Browser.

Department Sport & Gesundheit
Public Health Nutrition
Bildinformationen anzeigen

Publikationen


Liste im Research Information System öffnen

2021

Dietary Glycaemic Index Labelling: A Global Perspective.

A. Barclay, A. LSA, F. Brighenti, E. Delport, C. Henry, J. Sievenpiper, K. Usic, Y. Yuexin, A. Zurbau, W. TMS, A. Astrup, M. Bulló, A. Buyken, A. Ceriello, P. Ellis, M. Vanginkel, K. CWC, C. La Vecchia, G. Livesey, A. Poli, G. Riccardi, J. Salas-Salvadó, A. Trichopoulou, K. Bhaskaran, J. DJA, W. Willett, J. Brand-Miller, Nutrients (2021), 13(9)


Relevance of fructose intake in adolescence for fatty liver indices in young adulthood

I. Perrar, A. Buyken, K.J. Penczynski, T. Remer, G.G. Kuhnle, C. Herder, M. Roden, K. Della Corte, U. Nöthlings, U. Alexy, European Journal of Nutrition (2021), pp. 3029-3041

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec> <jats:title>Purpose</jats:title> <jats:p>To examine the association between fructose intake in adolescence and fatty liver indices (hepatic steatosis index (HSI), fatty liver index (FLI)) in young adulthood.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>Overall, 246 participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study who had a fasting blood sample in adulthood (18–36 years), at least two 3-day weighed dietary records for calculating fructose intakes and other fructose-containing sugars (total (TS), free (FS), added sugar (AS)) as well as two complete 24-h urine samples for calculating sugar excretion (fructose excretion (FE), fructose + sucrose excretion (FE + SE)) in adolescence (males: 9.5–16.5 years; females: 8.5–15.5 years) were analysed using multivariable linear regression analyses.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>On the level of dietary intake, no prospective associations were observed between adolescent fructose intake and both adult fatty liver indices, whereas higher FS intakes were associated with lower levels of HSI (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic><jats:sub>trend</jats:sub> = 0.02) and FLI (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic><jats:sub>trend</jats:sub> = 0.03). On the urinary excretion level, however, a higher FE (P<jats:sub>trend</jats:sub> = 0.03) and FE + SE (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic><jats:sub>trend</jats:sub> = 0.01) in adolescence were prospectively related to higher adult FLI values. No associations were observed between adolescent sugar excretion and adult HSI.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title> <jats:p>The present study does not provide unambiguous support for a detrimental impact of adolescent fructose intake on adult liver health. Nonetheless, further examinations estimating exposure by means of urinary excretion as well as dietary intake levels appear warranted.</jats:p> </jats:sec>


The Prospective Association of Dietary Sugar Intake in Adolescence With Risk Markers of Type 2 Diabetes in Young Adulthood

K.A. Della Corte, K. Penczynski, G. Kuhnle, I. Perrar, C. Herder, M. Roden, S.A. Wudy, T. Remer, U. Alexy, A. Buyken, Frontiers in Nutrition (2021)

<jats:p><jats:bold>Purpose:</jats:bold> To examine the prospective relevance of dietary sugar intake (based on dietary data as well as urinary excretion data) in adolescent years for insulin sensitivity and biomarkers of inflammation in young adulthood.</jats:p><jats:p><jats:bold>Methods:</jats:bold> Overall 254 participants of the DONALD study who had at least two 3-day weighed dietary records for calculating intakes of fructose, glucose, sucrose, total, free, added sugars, total sugars from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), juice, and sweets/sugar or at least two complete 24 h urine samples (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic> = 221) for calculating sugar excretion (urinary fructose and urinary fructose + sucrose) in adolescence (females: 9–15 years, males: 10–16 years) and a fasting blood sample in adulthood (18–36 years), were included in multivariable linear regression analyses assessing their prospective associations with adult homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-%S) and a pro-inflammatory score (based on CRP, IL-6, IL-18, leptin, chemerin, adiponectin).</jats:p><jats:p><jats:bold>Results:</jats:bold> On the dietary intake level, no prospective associations were observed between adolescent fructose, sucrose, glucose, added, free, total sugar, or total sugar from SSB, juice or sweets/sugar intake and adult HOMA2-%S (<jats:italic>p</jats:italic> &amp;gt; 0.01). On the urinary level, however, higher excreted fructose levels were associated with improved adult HOMA2-%S (<jats:italic>p</jats:italic> = 0.008) among females only. No associations were observed between dietary or urinary sugars and the adult pro-inflammatory score (<jats:italic>p</jats:italic> &amp;gt; 0.01).</jats:p><jats:p><jats:bold>Conclusion:</jats:bold> The present study did not provide support that dietary sugar consumed in adolescence is associated with adult insulin sensitivity. The one potential exception was the moderate dietary consumption of fructose, which showed a beneficial association with adult fasting insulin and insulin sensitivity.</jats:p>


Changes in chronotype and social jetlag during adolescence and their association with concurrent changes in BMI-SDS and body composition, in the DONALD Study

N. Jankovic, S. Schmitting, B. Krüger, U. Nöthlings, A.E. Buyken, U. Alexy, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2021)

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec> <jats:title>Background/objectives</jats:title> <jats:p>Adolescence is a critical period for both the development of overweight and the transition toward a later chronotype, often accompanied by an increase in social jetlag. This study assessed whether changes in chronotype and social jetlag, are linked to changes in body composition during adolescence.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Subjects/methods</jats:title> <jats:p>We used data from the DONALD open cohort study, collected between 2014 and 2019, from 213 adolescents (9–17 years at baseline, 45% females) having at least two measures of chronotype and anthropometry (<jats:italic>N</jats:italic> = 572). Chronotype was assessed with the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire and defined as: midpoint of sleep corrected for sleep-debt (MSFsc) accumulated over the week (later MSFsc represents later chronotype). Social jetlag (SJL) defines the difference between midpoint of sleep during week and weekend. Calculations for Fat Free Mass Index (FFMI [kg/m<jats:sup>2</jats:sup>)]) and Fat Mass Index (FMI) [kg/m<jats:sup>2</jats:sup>)]) were based on body fat percentage, weight, and height. To analyze the associations, we used linear mixed-effect regression models. Finally, the total cohort was split into three biologically relevant age groups (cut-off set at &lt;12 years, ≥12 to ≤15 years and &gt;15 years).</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Median follow-up was 2.1 years. Overall, change toward a later chronotype was significantly related with an increase in FMI (ß: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01–0.08). A 1 h increase in social jetlag predicted an increase in BMI-SDS of 0.08 SDS units (95% CI: 0.01–0.14) and in FMI of 0.04 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.003–0.08). Associations were stronger for the age group ≥12 to ≤15 years (<jats:italic>p</jats:italic> for interaction: &lt;0.001). No relationship was found with FFMI.</jats:p> </jats:sec><jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title> <jats:p>Changes in MSFsc and SJL during adolescence were associated with concurrent changes in BMI-SDS and FMI. The age ≥12 to ≤15 years appears to be a sensitive period in which chronobiological changes were clearly associated with increasing body fatness.</jats:p> </jats:sec>


Relevance of dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and fiber intake before and during pregnancy for the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus and maternal glucose homeostasis

X. Zhang, Y. Gong, K. Della Corte, D. Yu, H. Xue, S. Shan, G. Tian, Y. Liang, J. Zhang, F. He, D. Yang, R. Zhou, W. Bao, A. Buyken, G. Cheng, Clinical Nutrition (2021), pp. 2791-2799

DOI


Early life factors and their relevance for markers of cardiometabolic risk in early adulthood

J. Nyasordzi, J. Conrad, J. Goletzke, H. Ludwig-Walz, C. Herder, M. Roden, S.A. Wudy, Y. Hua, T. Remer, A. Buyken, Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases (2021), pp. 2109-2121

DOI


International tables of glycemic index and glycemic load values 2021: a systematic review

F.S. Atkinson, J.C. Brand-Miller, K. Foster-Powell, A. Buyken, J. Goletzke, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2021), pp. 1625-1632

<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>Reliable tables of glycemic indexes (GIs) and glycemic loads (GLs) are critical to research examining the relationship between glycemic qualities of carbohydrate in foods, diets, and health. In the 12 years since the last edition of the tables, a large amount of new data has become available.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Objectives</jats:title> <jats:p>To systematically review and tabulate published and unpublished sources of reliable GI values, including an assessment of the reliability of the data.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>This edition of the tables lists over 4000 items, a 61% increase in the number of entries compared to the 2008 edition. The data have been separated into 2 lists. The first represents more precise values derived using the methodology recommended by the International Standards Organization (∼2100 items). The second list contains values determined using less robust methods, including using limited numbers of healthy subjects or with a large SEM (∼1900 food items).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Dairy products, legumes, pasta, and fruits were usually low-GI foods (≤55 on the 100-point glucose scale) and had consistent values around the world. Cereals and cereal products, however, including whole-grain or whole-meal versions, showed wide variation in GI values, presumably arising from variations in manufacturing methods. Breads, breakfast cereals, rice, savory snack products, and regional foods were available in high-, medium-, and low-GI versions. Most varieties of potato were high-GI foods, but specific low-GI varieties have now been identified.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title> <jats:p>The availability of new data on the GIs of foods will facilitate wider research and application of the twin concepts of GI and GL. Although the 2021 edition of the tables improves the quality and quantity of GI data available for research and clinical practice, GI testing of regional foods remains a priority. This systematic review was registered in PROSPERO as #171204.</jats:p> </jats:sec>


2020

Mapping postprandial responses sets the scene for targeted dietary advice

J. Brand-Miller, A. Buyken, Nature Medicine (2020), pp. 828-830

DOI


Dietary flavonoids among children and adolescents in the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study: intake, food sources and trends from 1985 until 2016

J. Rienks, K.J. Penczynski, S. Schmitting, A. Buyken, U. Nöthlings, British Journal of Nutrition (2020), pp. 1198-1206

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Flavonoids are suggested to reduce disease risk. Since dietary habits are acquired during early life, describing age and time trends of flavonoid intake and major food sources are important for monitoring and disease prevention in later life. We aimed to describe total flavonoid intake and food sources and to investigate age and time trends of flavonoid intake in 3–18-year-olds, from the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed study from 1985 to 2016. Intake was assessed annually using 3-d weighed food records (WFR). Flavonoid values were assigned using the United States Department of Agriculture database. Foods contributing to intake were determined. Age and time trends in total flavonoid and isoflavone density were analysed by sex with PROC MIXED. In total, 1312 children completed 10 758 WFR. Across all ages, daily mean total flavonoid density was lower in boys compared with girls (134 <jats:italic>v</jats:italic>. 146 mg/4184 kJ) and no difference in median isoflavone density (0·04 mg/4184 kJ per d) was found. The top five foods contributing to total flavonoid intake were apple with peel (15·0/17·1 %), strawberries (5·9/6·1 %), chocolate spread (3·9/3·5 %), orange juice (3·5/3·4 %) and pasta (3·5/3·4 %) for boys and girls, respectively. Overall, in boys, total flavonoid density decreased over the course of age and time. In girls, there was no association with age or time. In both sexes, isoflavone density followed a U-shaped age trend with no change over time. From a public health perspective, the overall observed downwards trend of flavonoid intake in boys deserves attention. Future initiatives should be tailored at maintaining a high flavonoid density as children age, specifically among boys.</jats:p>


Short-term effects of carbohydrates differing in glycemic index (GI) consumed at lunch on children’s cognitive function in a randomized crossover study

K. Jansen, J. Tempes, A. Drozdowska, M. Gutmann, M. Falkenstein, A. Buyken, L. Libuda, H. Rudolf, T. Lücke, M. Kersting, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2020), pp. 757-764

DOI


Early changes in hepatic energy metabolism and lipid content in recent-onset type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus

Y. Kupriyanova, O.P. Zaharia, P. Bobrov, Y. Karusheva, V. Burkart, J. Szendroedi, J. Hwang, M. Roden, M. Roden, H. Al-Hasani, V. Burkart, A. Buyken, G. Geerling, J. Hwang, C. Herder, A. Icks, K. Jandeleit-Dahm, S. Kahl, J. Kotzka, O. Kuss, E. Lammert, S. Trenkamp, W. Rathmann, J. Szendroedi, D. Ziegler, Journal of Hepatology (2020), pp. 1028-1037

DOI


World trends in sugar-sweetened beverage and dietary sugar intakes in children and adolescents: a systematic review

K. Della Corte, J. Fife, A. Gardner, B.L. Murphy, L. Kleis, D. Della Corte, L. Schwingshackl, J.D. LeCheminant, A. Buyken, Nutrition Reviews (2020), pp. 274-288

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Objective</jats:title> <jats:p>To provide a systematic overview of world dietary sugar and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake trends in children and adolescents.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Data Sources</jats:title> <jats:p>Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in the Cochrane Library were searched through January 2019 to identify longitudinal follow-up studies with time-trend data and repeated cross-sectional studies.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Data Extraction</jats:title> <jats:p>Data from studies reporting ≥ 2 measurements (sugars, SSB, or sweets/candy) over ≥ 2 years and included ≥ 20 healthy, normal- or overweight children or adolescents aged 1–19 years.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Data Analysis</jats:title> <jats:p>Data from 43 articles (n = 4 prospective cohort studies; n = 39 repeated cross-sectional studies) from 15 countries (n = 8 European countries plus Australia, Canada, China, South Korea, Mexico, Russia, and the United States) are presented narratively. According to the risk of bias in nonrandomized studies of interventions tool, 34 studies were judged to have a moderate risk of bias, and 5 to have a serious risk of bias.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title> <jats:p>Consumption among US children and adolescents increased substantially in the decades preceding 2000, followed by a faster and continued decline. As a whole, other international intake trends did not reveal drastic increases and decreases in SSB and dietary sugars; they tended to change only slightly across 3 decades.</jats:p> </jats:sec>


Dietary Fibre Consensus from the International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium (ICQC)

L.S.A. Augustin, A. Aas, A. Astrup, F.S. Atkinson, S. Baer-Sinnott, A.W. Barclay, J.C. Brand-Miller, F. Brighenti, M. Bullo, A. Buyken, A. Ceriello, P.R. Ellis, M. Ha, J.C. Henry, C.W.C. Kendall, C. La Vecchia, S. Liu, G. Livesey, A. Poli, J. Salas-Salvadó, G. Riccardi, U. Riserus, S.W. Rizkalla, J.L. Sievenpiper, A. Trichopoulou, K. Usic, T.M.S. Wolever, W.C. Willett, D.J.A. Jenkins, Nutrients (2020), 2553

<jats:p>Dietary fibre is a generic term describing non-absorbed plant carbohydrates and small amounts of associated non-carbohydrate components. The main contributors of fibre to the diet are the cell walls of plant tissues, which are supramolecular polymer networks containing variable proportions of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectic substances, and non-carbohydrate components, such as lignin. Other contributors of fibre are the intracellular storage oligosaccharides, such as fructans. A distinction needs to be made between intrinsic sources of dietary fibre and purified forms of fibre, given that the three-dimensional matrix of the plant cell wall confers benefits beyond fibre isolates. Movement through the digestive tract modifies the cell wall structure and may affect the interactions with the colonic microbes (e.g., small intestinally non-absorbed carbohydrates are broken down by bacteria to short-chain fatty acids, absorbed by colonocytes). These aspects, combined with the fibre associated components (e.g., micronutrients, polyphenols, phytosterols, and phytoestrogens), may contribute to the health outcomes seen with the consumption of dietary fibre. Therefore, where possible, processing should minimise the degradation of the plant cell wall structures to preserve some of its benefits. Food labelling should include dietary fibre values and distinguish between intrinsic and added fibre. Labelling may also help achieve the recommended intake of 14 g/1000 kcal/day.</jats:p>


Inflammatory mediators in the adipo-renal axis: leptin, adiponectin, and soluble ICAM-1

Y. Hua, C. Herder, H. Kalhoff, A. Buyken, J. Esche, D. Krupp, S.A. Wudy, T. Remer, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology (2020), pp. F469-F475

<jats:p> A lower 24-h urine pH (24h-pH), i.e., a higher renal excretion of free protons, at a given acid load to the body, denotes a reduction in the kidney’s capacity for net acid excretion (NAE). There is increasing evidence, not only for patients with type 2 diabetes but also for healthy individuals, that higher body fatness or waist circumference (WC) has a negative impact on renal function to excrete acids (NAE). We hypothesized that adiposity-related inflammation molecules might mediate this relation between adiposity and renal acid excretion function. Twelve biomarkers of inflammation were measured in fasting blood samples from 162 adult participants (18–25 yr old) of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study who had undergone anthropometric measurements and collected 24-h urine samples. Both Baron and Kenny’s (B&amp;K’s) steps to test mediation and causal mediation analysis were conducted to examine the potential mediatory roles of biomarkers of inflammation in the WC-24-h pH relationship after strictly controlling for laboratory-measured NAE. In B&amp;K’s mediation analysis, leptin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), and adiponectin significantly associated with the outcome 24-h pH and attenuated the WC-pH relation. In agreement herewith, causal mediation analysis estimated the “natural indirect effects” of WC on 24-h pH via leptin ( P = 0.01) and adiponectin ( P = 0.03) to be significant, with a trend for sICAM-1 ( P = 0.09). The calculated proportions mediated by leptin, adiponectin, and sICAM-1 were 64%, 23%, and 12%, respectively. Both mediation analyses identified an inflammatory cytokine (leptin) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (adiponectin) along with sICAM-1 as being potentially involved in mediating adiposity-related influences on renal acid excretion capacity. </jats:p>


Early life factors and their relevance to intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery in early adulthood

J. Nyasordzi, K. Penczynski, T. Remer, A. Buyken, PLOS ONE (2020), e0233227

DOI


Reply to Khan et al.

L. Schwingshackl, M. Neuenschwander, G. Hoffmann, A. Buyken, S. Schlesinger, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2020), pp. 917-918

DOI


Sugar intake among German adolescents: trends from 1990 to 2016 based on biomarker excretion in 24-h urine samples

I. Perrar, N. Gray, G.G. Kuhnle, T. Remer, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, British Journal of Nutrition (2020), pp. 164-172

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Trend analyses based on dietary records suggest decreases in the intakes of total sugar (TS), added and free sugar since 2005 among children and adolescents in Germany. In terms of age trends, TS intake decreased with increasing age. However, self-reported sugar intake in epidemiological studies is criticised, as it may be prone to bias due to selective underreporting. Furthermore, adolescents are more susceptible to underreporting than children. We thus analysed time and age trends in urinary fructose excretion (FE), sucrose excretion (SE) and the sum of both (FE + SE) as biomarkers for sugar intake among 8·5–16·5-year-old adolescents. Urinary sugar excretion was measured by UPLC-MS/MS in 997 24-h urine samples collected from 239 boys and 253 girls participating in the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study cohort between 1990 and 2016. Time and age trends of log-transformed FE, SE and FE + SE were analysed using polynomial mixed-effects regression models. Between 1990 and 2016, FE as well as FE + SE decreased (linear time trend: <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·0272 and <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0·0001, respectively). A minor increase in excretion during adolescence was confined to FE (linear age trend: <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·0017). The present 24-h excretion measurements support a previously reported dietary record-based decline in sugar intake since 2005. However, the previously seen dietary record-based decrease in TS from childhood to late adolescence was not confirmed by our biomarker analysis, suggesting a constant sugar intake for the period of adolescence.</jats:p>


The Relationship between Glycemic Index and Health

J. Brand-Miller, A. Buyken, Nutrients (2020), 536

<jats:p>There is no question that elevated postprandial glycemia is a significant driver of common chronic diseases globally [...]</jats:p>


2019

Age and time trends in sugar intake among children and adolescents: results from the DONALD study

I. Perrar, S. Schmitting, K.W. Della Corte, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, European Journal of Nutrition (2019), pp. 1043-1054

DOI


Is there a soft drink vs. alcohol seesaw? A cross-sectional analysis of dietary data in the Australian Health Survey 2011–12

T.H.T. Wong, A. Buyken, J.C. Brand-Miller, J.C.Y. Louie, European Journal of Nutrition (2019), pp. 2357-2367

DOI


Dietary sugars and cardiometabolic risk factors: a network meta-analysis on isocaloric substitution interventions

L. Schwingshackl, M. Neuenschwander, G. Hoffmann, A. Buyken, S. Schlesinger, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2019)

<jats:title>ABSTRACT</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>There is controversy on the relevance of dietary sugar intake for cardiometabolic health.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Objective</jats:title> <jats:p>The aim of this network meta-analysis (NMA) was to assess how isocaloric substitutions of dietary sugar with other carbohydrates affect cardiometabolic risk factors, comparing different intervention studies.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the isocaloric effect of substituting dietary sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose) with other sugars or starch on cardiometabolic risk markers, including LDL cholesterol, triacylglycerol (TG), fasting glucose (FG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), uric acid, C-reactive protein (CRP), alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and liver fat content. To identify the most beneficial intervention for each outcome, random-effects NMA was conducted by calculating pooled mean differences (MDs) with 95% CIs, and by ranking the surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRAs). The certainty of evidence was evaluated using the Confidence In Network Meta-Analysis tool.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>Thirty-eight RCTs, including 1383 participants, were identified. A reduction in LDL-cholesterol concentrations was shown for the exchange of sucrose with starch (MD: −0.23 mmol/L; 95% CI: −0.38, −0.07 mmol/L) or fructose with starch (MD: −0.22 mmol/L; 95% CI: −0.39, −0.05 mmol/L; SUCRAstarch: 98%). FG concentrations were also lower for the exchange of sucrose with starch (MD: −0.14 mmol/L; 95% CI: −0.29, 0.01 mmol/L; SUCRAstarch: 91%). Replacing fructose with an equivalent energy amount of glucose reduced HOMA-IR (MD: −0.36; 95% CI: −0.71, −0.02; SUCRAglucose: 74%) and uric acid (MD: −23.77 µmol/L; 95% CI: −44.21, −3.32 µmol/L; SUCRAglucose: 93%). The certainty of evidence was rated very low to moderate. No significant effects were observed for TG, HbA1c, CRP, ALT, and AST.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title> <jats:p>Our findings indicate that substitution of sucrose and fructose with starch yielded lower LDL cholesterol. Insulin resistance and uric acid concentrations were beneficially affected by replacement of fructose with glucose. Our findings are limited by the very low to moderate certainty of evidence. This review was registered at www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero as CRD42018080297.</jats:p> </jats:sec>


Time and Age Trends in Free Sugar Intake from Food Groups among Children and Adolescents between 1985 and 2016

I. Perrar, A.M. Schadow, S. Schmitting, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, Nutrients (2019), 20

<jats:p>Trend analyses suggest that free sugar (FS) intake—while still exceeding 10%E—has decreased among German children and adolescents since 2005, yet that intakes may shift from sugars naturally occurring in foods to added sugars as children age. Thus, we analysed time and age trends in FS intake (%E) from food groups among 3–18 year-olds (1985–2016) using 10,761 3-day dietary records from 1312 DONALD participants (660 boys, 652 girls) by use of polynomial mixed-effects regression models. Among girls, FS from sugar &amp; sweets decreased from 1985 to 2016 (linear trend p &lt; 0.0001), but not among boys (p &gt; 0.05). In the total sample, FS intake from juices increased until 2000 and decreased since 2005 (linear, quadratic trend p &lt; 0.0001). FS from sugar sweetened beverages (SSB) decreased non-linearly from 1985 to 2016 (girls: linear, quadratic, cubic trend p &lt; 0.0001; boys: linear, quadratic, cubic trend p &lt; 0.02). Younger children consumed more FS from juices than older ones, who had a higher FS intake from SSB. FS intake from sugar &amp; sweets increased until early adolescence and decreased afterwards. Since sugar &amp; sweets represent the main source of FS intake and the source with the least pronounced decline in intake, public health measures should focus on these products.</jats:p>


Dietary Glycemic Index and Load and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Updated Meta-Analyses of Prospective Cohort Studies

G. Livesey, R. Taylor, H.F. Livesey, A. Buyken, D.J.A. Jenkins, L.S.A. Augustin, J.L. Sievenpiper, A.W. Barclay, S. Liu, T.M.S. Wolever, W.C. Willett, F. Brighenti, J. Salas-Salvadó, I. Björck, S.W. Rizkalla, G. Riccardi, C.L. Vecchia, A. Ceriello, A. Trichopoulou, A. Poli, A. Astrup, C.W.C. Kendall, M. Ha, S. Baer-Sinnott, J.C. Brand-Miller, Nutrients (2019), 1280

<jats:p>Published meta-analyses indicate significant but inconsistent incident type-2 diabetes (T2D)-dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) risk ratios or risk relations (RR). It is now over a decade ago that a published meta-analysis used a predefined standard to identify valid studies. Considering valid studies only, and using random effects dose–response meta-analysis (DRM) while withdrawing spurious results (p &lt; 0.05), we ascertained whether these relations would support nutrition guidance, specifically for an RR &gt; 1.20 with a lower 95% confidence limit &gt;1.10 across typical intakes (approximately 10th to 90th percentiles of population intakes). The combined T2D–GI RR was 1.27 (1.15–1.40) (p &lt; 0.001, n = 10 studies) per 10 units GI, while that for the T2D–GL RR was 1.26 (1.15–1.37) (p &lt; 0.001, n = 15) per 80 g/d GL in a 2000 kcal (8400 kJ) diet. The corresponding global DRM using restricted cubic splines were 1.87 (1.56–2.25) (p &lt; 0.001, n = 10) and 1.89 (1.66–2.16) (p &lt; 0.001, n = 15) from 47.6 to 76.1 units GI and 73 to 257 g/d GL in a 2000 kcal diet, respectively. In conclusion, among adults initially in good health, diets higher in GI or GL were robustly associated with incident T2D. Together with mechanistic and other data, this supports that consideration should be given to these dietary risk factors in nutrition advice. Concerning the public health relevance at the global level, our evidence indicates that GI and GL are substantial food markers predicting the development of T2D worldwide, for persons of European ancestry and of East Asian ancestry.</jats:p>


Dietary Glycemic Index and Load and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Assessment of Causal Relations

G. Livesey, R. Taylor, H.F. Livesey, A. Buyken, D.J.A. Jenkins, L.S.A. Augustin, J.L. Sievenpiper, A.W. Barclay, S. Liu, T.M.S. Wolever, W.C. Willett, F. Brighenti, J. Salas-Salvadó, I. Björck, S.W. Rizkalla, G. Riccardi, C.L. Vecchia, A. Ceriello, A. Trichopoulou, A. Poli, A. Astrup, C.W.C. Kendall, M. Ha, S. Baer-Sinnott, J.C. Brand-Miller, Nutrients (2019), 1436

<jats:p>While dietary factors are important modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D), the causal role of carbohydrate quality in nutrition remains controversial. Dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) have been examined in relation to the risk of T2D in multiple prospective cohort studies. Previous meta-analyses indicate significant relations but consideration of causality has been minimal. Here, the results of our recent meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies of 4 to 26-y follow-up are interpreted in the context of the nine Bradford-Hill criteria for causality, that is: (1) Strength of Association, (2) Consistency, (3) Specificity, (4) Temporality, (5) Biological Gradient, (6) Plausibility, (7) Experimental evidence, (8) Analogy, and (9) Coherence. These criteria necessitated referral to a body of literature wider than prospective cohort studies alone, especially in criteria 6 to 9. In this analysis, all nine of the Hill’s criteria were met for GI and GL indicating that we can be confident of a role for GI and GL as causal factors contributing to incident T2D. In addition, neither dietary fiber nor cereal fiber nor wholegrain were found to be reliable or effective surrogate measures of GI or GL. Finally, our cost–benefit analysis suggests food and nutrition advice favors lower GI or GL and would produce significant potential cost savings in national healthcare budgets. The high confidence in causal associations for incident T2D is sufficient to consider inclusion of GI and GL in food and nutrient-based recommendations.</jats:p>


Developmental trajectories of body mass index from childhood into late adolescence and subsequent late adolescence–young adulthood cardiometabolic risk markers

K. Oluwagbemigun, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, M. Schmid, C. Herder, U. Nöthlings, Cardiovascular Diabetology (2019)

DOI


2018

Habitual Fructose Intake Relates to Insulin Sensitivity and Fatty Liver Index in Recent-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Patients and Individuals without Diabetes.

K. Weber, M. Simon, K. Strassburger, D. Markgraf, A. Buyken, J. Szendroedi, K. Müssig, M. Roden, G. Group, Nutrients (2018), 10(6)


Dietary carbohydrates: a review of international recommendations and the methods used to derive them.

A. Buyken, D. Mela, P. Dussort, I. Johnson, I. Macdonald, J. Stowell, B. FJPH, Eur J Clin Nutr (2018), 72(12), pp. 1625-1643


Relation of dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, added sugar intake, or fiber intake to the development of body composition between ages 2 and 7 y

A. Buyken, G. Cheng, A.L. Günther, A.D. Liese, T. Remer, N. Karaolis-Danckert, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2018), pp. 755-762

DOI


Flavonoid intake from fruit and vegetables during adolescence is prospectively associated with a favourable risk factor profile for type 2 diabetes in early adulthood

K.J. Penczynski, C. Herder, D. Krupp, J. Rienks, S. Egert, S.A. Wudy, M. Roden, T. Remer, A. Buyken, European Journal of Nutrition (2018), pp. 1159-1172

DOI


Effect of Dietary Sugar Intake on Biomarkers of Subclinical Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Intervention Studies

K. Della Corte, I. Perrar, K. Penczynski, L. Schwingshackl, C. Herder, A. Buyken, Nutrients (2018), 606

DOI


The relevance of restrained eating behavior for circadian eating patterns in adolescents

S.A.J. Koch, U. Alexy, T. Diederichs, A. Buyken, S. Roßbach, PLOS ONE (2018), e0197131

DOI


Dietary Patterns in Primary School are of Prospective Relevance for the Development of Body Composition in Two German Pediatric Populations

M. Wolters, G. Joslowski, S. Plachta-Danielzik, M. Standl, M. Müller, W. Ahrens, A. Buyken, Nutrients (2018), 1442

<jats:p>This study performed comparative analyses in two pediatric cohorts to identify dietary patterns during primary school years and examined their relevance to body composition development. Nutritional and anthropometric data at the beginning of primary school and two or four years later were available from 298 and 372 participants of IDEFICS-Germany (Identification and prevention of Dietary-induced and lifestyle-induced health Effects In Children and infants Study) and the KOPS (Kiel Obesity Prevention Study) cohort, respectively. Principal component analyses (PCA) and reduced rank regression (RRR) were used to identify dietary patterns at baseline and patterns of change in food group intake during primary school years. RRR extracted patterns explaining variations in changes in body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI), and waist-to-height-ratio (WtHR). Associations between pattern adherence and excess gain in BMI, FMI, or WtHR (&gt;75th percentile) during primary school years were examined using logistic regression. Among PCA patterns, only a change towards a more Mediterranean food choice during primary school years were associated with a favorable body composition development in IDEFICS-Germany (p &lt; 0.05). In KOPS, RRR patterns characterized by a frequent consumption of fast foods or starchy carbohydrate foods were consistently associated with an excess gain in BMI and WtHR (all p &lt; 0.005). In IDEFICS-Germany, excess gain in BMI, FMI, and WtHR were predicted by a frequent consumption of nuts, meat, and pizza at baseline and a decrease in the consumption frequency of protein sources and snack carbohydrates during primary school years (all p &lt; 0.01). The study confirms an adverse impact of fast food consumption on body composition during primary school years. Combinations of protein and carbohydrate sources deserve further investigation.</jats:p>


Network meta-analysis reaches nutrition research

L. Schwingshackl, A. Buyken, A. Chaimani, European Journal of Nutrition (2018), pp. 1-3

DOI


Effects of breastfeeding on health outcomes in childhood: beyond dose-response relations

A. Buyken, N. Karaolis-Danckert, A. Günther, M. Kersting, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2018), pp. 1964-1965

DOI


Habitual Flavonoid Intake from Fruit and Vegetables during Adolescence and Serum Lipid Levels in Early Adulthood: A Prospective Analysis

K. Penczynski, T. Remer, C. Herder, H. Kalhoff, J. Rienks, D. Markgraf, M. Roden, A. Buyken, Nutrients (2018), 488

DOI


In adolescence a higher ‘eveningness in energy intake’ is associated with higher total daily energy intake

T. Diederichs, I. Perrar, S. Roßbach, U. Alexy, A. Buyken, Appetite (2018), pp. 159-166

DOI


Positive Effects of Practical Nutrition Lessons in a Primary SchoolSetting with a High Proportion of Migrant School Children

K.S. Weber, J. Eitner, L. Dauben, O. Spörkel, K. Strassburger, J. Sommer, B. Kaiser, A. Buyken, P. Kronsbein, K. Müssig, Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes (2018), pp. 111-118

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p> Background Children with migration background are at increased risk for overweight, partly due to less favorable dietary habits compared to their German counterparts. We examined the effects of practical nutrition lessons among children with a high proportion of migration background in a primary school setting.</jats:p><jats:p> Methods Ten 3rd and 4th grade classes (n=166 children, 73% with migration background) received the intervention and nine school classes (n=139 children, 76% with migration background) served as control. Before, shortly after (only among the intervention group) and three months after the three-day practical nutrition lessons, the nutrition-related skills, behavior, attitudes, and knowledge of the children were assessed using a questionnaire. Changes between baseline and 1st follow-up among children of the intervention group were calculated using linear mixed models. Differences between the two groups for changes between baseline and 2nd follow-up were tested using linear regression analyses. Models were adjusted for potential confounders.</jats:p><jats:p> Results Shortly after the practical nutrition lessons, the children of the intervention group had improved their knowledge (β=1.7; 95% CI: 1.0; 2.4, P&lt;0.001) and skills (β=1.8; 95% CI: 1.4; 2.2, P&lt;0.001). These changes were sustainable and larger in the intervention compared to the control group (knowledge: β=1.6; 95% CI: 0.7; 2.5, P&lt;0.001; skills: β=1.3; 95% CI: 0.7; 1.9, P&lt;0.001). Changes in nutrition-related behavior and attitudes did not differ between the groups.</jats:p><jats:p> Conclusions Providing practical nutrition lessons in a primary school setting with a high proportion of children with immigrational background improved the children’s nutrition-related knowledge and skills.</jats:p>


Time and age trends in morning and evening protein intakes of German children and adolescents

S. Roßbach, T. Diederichs, C. Herder, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, Journal of Nutritional Science (2018)

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The present study describes time and age trends in morning and evening protein intakes and sources among German children and adolescents from 1985 to 2014. A total of 9757 three-day weighed dietary records of 1246 3- to 18-year-old participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) study were analysed using polynomial mixed-effects regression models. Morning protein intake increased over the study period by approximately 1 % of morning energy intake (linear trend <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0·0001), with the youngest and the oldest children having the highest protein intake (linear, quadratic trend <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0·0001). Evening protein intake increased over time by approximately 2 % of evening energy intake in girls (linear trend <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0·0001) and 1 % of evening energy intake in boys (quadratic trend <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·0313), with decreasing intake with age (girls: linear trend <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0·0001; boys: linear trend <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·0963). Time trends were largely due to increases in protein from ‘starchy foods’. In conclusion, morning and evening protein intakes increased modestly between 1985 and 2014; these increases were, however, not accompanied by increases in traditional protein sources (i.e. meat or dairy products).</jats:p>


2017

Carbohydrates from Sources with a Higher Glycemic Index during Adolescence: Is Evening Rather than Morning Intake Relevant for Risk Markers of Type 2 Diabetes in Young Adulthood?

T. Diederichs, C. Herder, S. Roßbach, M. Roden, S. Wudy, U. Nöthlings, U. Alexy, A. Buyken, Nutrients (2017), 9(6)


Relevance of the dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and genetic predisposition for the glucose homeostasis of Chinese adults without diabetes

G. Cheng, H. Xue, J. Luo, H. Jia, L. Zhang, J. Dai, A. Buyken, Scientific Reports (2017)

DOI


Relevance of chronotype for eating patterns in adolescents

S. Roßbach, T. Diederichs, U. Nöthlings, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, Chronobiology International (2017), pp. 336-347

DOI


Dietary Fatty Acids and Changes in Blood Lipids during Adolescence: The Role of Substituting Nutrient Intakes

C. Harris, A. Buyken, S. Koletzko, A. von Berg, D. Berdel, T. Schikowski, B. Koletzko, J. Heinrich, M. Standl, Nutrients (2017), 127

DOI


Lower glycemic load meals reduce diurnal glycemic oscillations in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes

N.V. Kizirian, J. Goletzke, S. Brodie, F.S. Atkinson, T.P. Markovic, G.P. Ross, A. Buyken, J.P. Brand-Miller, BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care (2017), e000351

DOI


Positive Effects of Promoting Physical Activity and Balanced Diets in a Primary School Setting with a High Proportion of Migrant School Children

K. Weber, O. Spörkel, M. Mertens, A. Freese, K. Strassburger, B. Kemper, C. Bachmann, K. Diehlmann, T. Stemper, A. Buyken, K. Ketelhut, K. Müssig, Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes (2017), pp. 554-562

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p> Background Children with migration background are at particular risk for overweight. We assessed the effects of a primary school-based initiative targeted at enhancing physical activity and dietary education among children with a high proportion of migration background.</jats:p><jats:p> Methods Four 3rd and 4th grade classes (n=70 children, 77% with migration background) participated in a 10-months intervention comprising 2 additional exercise lessons weekly and 10 nutrition lessons per school year. 6 school classes (n=125 children, 65% with migration background) served as control. Before and after the intervention, an assessment of physical fitness and motor skills and questionnaires on dietary behavior and knowledge were conducted. In a subgroup (n=37), after 6 months of the intervention, daily physical activity was assessed by accelerometer-based monitoring. Differences in changes between the groups were assessed using linear regression analyses.</jats:p><jats:p> Results Changes between the 2 time points for fitness and motor skill tests (differences in standard deviation scores) were larger in the intervention than in the control group for the total mean test value (β=0.38, p&lt;0.001), driven by higher improvements in 5 of the 8 test items, i.e., obstacle race (speed) (β=0.22, p=0.049), standing long jump (strength) (β=0.35, p&lt;0.001), sit-ups (strength) (β=0.33, p=0.002), stand and reach (mobility) (β=0.22, p=0.042), and 6 min run (endurance) (β=0.40, p&lt;0.001), independently of confounders. Changes in dietary knowledge and consumption frequencies did not differ between groups.</jats:p><jats:p> Conclusions Promoting guided physical activity in a primary school setting with a high proportion of children with migration background positively affected parameters of fitness and motor skills.</jats:p>


2016

The Impact of Dietary Factors on Glycemic Control, Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion in the First Years after Diagnosis of Diabetes.

K. Weber, A. Buyken, B. Nowotny, K. Strassburger, M. Simon, G. Pacini, J. Szendroedi, K. Müssig, M. Roden, G. Group, Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes (2016), 124(4), pp. 230-238


Associations between explorative dietary patterns and serum lipid levels and their interactions with ApoA5 and ApoE haplotype in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes.

K. Weber, B. Knebel, K. Strassburger, J. Kotzka, P. Stehle, J. Szendroedi, K. Müssig, A. Buyken, M. Roden, G. Group, Cardiovasc Diabetol (2016), 15(1), pp. 138


Glycaemic and insulin index of four common German breads

J. Goletzke, F.S. Atkinson, K.L. Ek, K. Bell, J.C. Brand-Miller, A. Buyken, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2016), pp. 808-811

DOI


Commercial complementary food consumption is prospectively associated with added sugar intake in childhood

K. Foterek, A. Buyken, K. Bolzenius, A. Hilbig, U. Nöthlings, U. Alexy, British Journal of Nutrition (2016), pp. 2067-2074

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Given that commercial complementary food (CF) can contain high levels of added sugar, a high consumption may predispose to a preference for sweet taste later in life. This study examined cross-sectional associations between commercial CF consumption and added sugar intake in infancy as well as its prospective relation to added sugar intake in pre-school and primary-school age children. In all, 288 children of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study with 3-d weighed dietary records at 0·5 and 0·75 (infancy), 3 and 4 (pre-school age) and 6 and 7 years of age (primary-school age) were included in this analysis. Individual commercial CF consumption as percentage of total commercial CF (%cCF) was averaged at 0·5 and 0·75 years. Individual total added sugar intake (g/d, energy percentage/d) was averaged for all three age groups. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to analyse associations between %cCF and added sugar intake. In infancy, a higher %cCF was associated with odds for high added sugar intake from CF and for high total added sugar intake (&gt;75th percentile, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt;0·033). Prospectively, a higher %cCF was related to higher added sugar intake in both pre-school (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt;0·041) and primary-school age children (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>&lt;0·039), although these associations were attenuated in models adjusting for added sugar intake in infancy. A higher %cCF in infancy may predispose to higher added sugar intake in later childhood by virtue of its added sugar content. Therefore, offering home-made CF or carefully chosen commercial CF without added sugar might be one strategy to reduce sugar intake in infancy and later on.</jats:p>


Age and time trends in eating frequency and duration of nightly fasting of German children and adolescents

S. Roßbach, T. Diederichs, K. Bolzenius, C. Herder, A. Buyken, U. Alexy, European Journal of Nutrition (2016), pp. 2507-2517

DOI


Prospective associations of meat consumption during childhood with measures of body composition during adolescence: results from the GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts.

C. Harris, A. Buyken, A. von Berg, D. Berdel, I. Lehmann, B. Hoffmann, S. Koletzko, B. Koletzko, J. Heinrich, M. Standl, Nutr J (2016), 15(1), pp. 101


Relevance of Morning and Evening Energy and Macronutrient Intake during Childhood for Body Composition in Early Adolescence

T. Diederichs, S. Roßbach, C. Herder, U. Alexy, A. Buyken, Nutrients (2016), 716

DOI


2015

Changes in dietary intake during puberty and their determinants: results from the GINIplus birth cohort study

C.. Harris, C. Flexeder, E. Thiering, A. Buyken, D. Berdel, S. Koletzko, C. Bauer, I. Brüske, B. Koletzko, M. Standl, BMC Public Health (2015), 15, pp. 841

Background Understanding changes in dietary intake during puberty could aid the mapping of dietary interventions for primary prevention. The present study describes dietary changes from childhood to adolescence, and their associations with parental education, family income, child education, body mass index (BMI), pubertal onset and screen-time sedentary behaviour. Methods Dietary data (n = 1232) were obtained from food frequency questionnaires at the 10- and 15-year follow-ups of the GINIplus birth cohort study. Intakes of 17 food groups, macronutrients and antioxidant vitamins, were described by a) paired Wilcoxon rank sum tests, comparing average intakes at each time-point, and b) Cohen’s kappa “tracking” coefficients, measuring stability of intakes (maintenance of relative tertile positions across time). Further, associations of changes (tertile position increase or decrease vs. tracking) with parental education, family income, child education, pubertal onset, BMI, and screen-time, were assessed by logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression models stratified by baseline intake tertile. Results Both sexes increased average intakes of water and decreased starchy vegetables, margarine and dairy. Females decreased meat and retinol intakes and increased vegetables, grains, oils and tea. Males decreased fruit and carbohydrates and increased average intakes of meat, caloric drinks, water, protein, fat, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol. Both sexes presented mainly “fair” tracking levels [κw = 0.21–0.40]. Females with high (vs. low) parental education were more likely to increase their nut intake [OR = 3.8; 95 % CI = (1.7;8.8)], and less likely to decrease vitamin C intakes [0.2 (0.1;0.5)], while males were less likely to increase egg consumption [0.2 (0.1;0.5)] and n3 PUFAs [0.2 (0.1;0.5)]. Females with a higher (vs. low) family income were more likely to maintain medium wholegrain intakes [0.2 (0.1;0.7) for decrease vs. tracking, and 0.1 (0.0;0.5) for increase vs. tracking], and were less likely to decrease vitamin C intakes [0.2 (0.1;0.6)]. Males with high education were less likely to increase sugar-sweetened foods [0.1 (0.1;0.4)]. Finally, BMI in females was negatively associated with decreasing protein intakes [0.7 (0.6;0.9)]. In males BMI was positively associated with increasing margarine [1.4 (1.1;1.6)] and vitamin C intakes [1.4 (1.1;1.6)], and negatively associated with increasing n3 PUFA. Conclusions Average dietary intakes changed significantly, despite fair tracking levels, suggesting the presence of trends in dietary behaviour during puberty. Family income and parental education predominantly influenced intake changes. Our results support the rationale for dietary interventions targeting children, and suggest that sex-specific subpopulations, e.g. low socio-economic status, should be considered for added impact.


Effects of human milk and formula on postprandial glycaemia and insulinaemia

C.J. Wright, F.S. Atkinson, N. Ramalingam, A. Buyken, J.C. Brand-Miller, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2015), pp. 939-943

DOI


Dietary micronutrient intake during pregnancy is a function of carbohydrate quality

J. Goletzke, A. Buyken, J.C. Louie, R.G. Moses, J.C. Brand-Miller, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2015), pp. 626-632

DOI


Early Diet and Later Cancer Risk: Prospective Associations of Dietary Patterns During Critical Periods of Childhood with the GH-IGF Axis, Insulin Resistance and Body Fatness in Younger Adulthood

A.L.B. Günther, M.B. Schulze, A. Kroke, K. Diethelm, G. Joslowski, D. Krupp, S. Wudy, A. Buyken, Nutrition and Cancer (2015), pp. 877-892

DOI


Relevance of fruits, vegetables and flavonoids from fruits and vegetables during early life, mid-childhood and adolescence for levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and its binding proteins IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in young adulthood

D. Krupp, T. Remer, K.J. Penczynski, K. Bolzenius, S.A. Wudy, A. Buyken, British Journal of Nutrition (2015), pp. 527-537

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>The growth hormone (GH) insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis has been linked to insulin metabolism and cancer risk. Experimental evidence indicates that the GH–IGF axis itself can be influenced by dietary flavonoids. As fruit and vegetable (FV) intake is a major source of flavonoid consumption, FV’s beneficial health effects may be explained via flavonoids’ influence on the GH–IGF axis, but observational evidence is currently rare. We used data from Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study participants to analyse prospective associations between FV, fruit intake and flavonoid intake from FV (FlavFV) with IGF-1 and its binding proteins IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3. Subjects needed to provide a fasting blood sample in adulthood (18–39 years) and at least two 3-d weighed dietary records in early life (0·5−2 years,<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>191), mid-childhood (3−7 years,<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>265) or adolescence (girls: 9−15 years, boys: 10−16 years,<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>261). Additional analyses were conducted among those providing at least three 24-h urine samples in adolescence (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>236) to address the predictor urinary hippuric acid (HA), a biomarker of polyphenol intake. Higher fruit intake in mid-childhood and adolescence was related to higher IGFBP-2 in adulthood (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>=0·03 and<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>=0·045). Comparable trends (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>=0·045−0·09) were discernable for FV intake (but not FlavFV) in all three time windows. Similarly, higher adolescent HA excretion tended to be related (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>=0·06) to higher adult IGFBP-2 levels. Regarding IGFBP-3, a marginal (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>=0·08) positive association was observed with FlavFV in mid-childhood only. None of the investigated dietary factors was related to IGF-1. In conclusion, higher fruit and FV intakes during growth may be relevant for adult IGFBP-2, but probably not for IGFBP-3 or IGF-1.</jats:p>


Relative validation of 24-h urinary hippuric acid excretion as a biomarker for dietary flavonoid intake from fruit and vegetables in healthy adolescents

K.J. Penczynski, D. Krupp, A. Bring, K. Bolzenius, T. Remer, A. Buyken, European Journal of Nutrition (2015), pp. 757-766

DOI


Glycemic index, glycemic load and glycemic response: An International Scientific Consensus Summit from the International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium (ICQC)

L. Augustin, C. Kendall, D. Jenkins, W. Willett, A. Astrup, A. Barclay, I. Björck, J. Brand-Miller, F. Brighenti, A. Buyken, A. Ceriello, C. La Vecchia, G. Livesey, S. Liu, G. Riccardi, S. Rizkalla, J. Sievenpiper, A. Trichopoulou, T. Wolever, S. Baer-Sinnott, A. Poli, Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases (2015), pp. 795-815

DOI


Low vs High Glycemic Index Diet

J.C. Brand-Miller, A. Astrup, A. Buyken, JAMA (2015), 1371

DOI


2014

Glycaemic index: did Health Canada get it wrong? Position from the International Carbohydrate Quality Consortium (ICQC).

I. Carbohydrate Quality Consortium, D. Jenkins, W. Willett, A. Astrup, L. Augustin, S. Baer-Sinnott, A. Barclay, I. Björck, J. Brand-Miller, F. Brighenti, A. Buyken, A. Ceriello, C. Kendall, C. La Vecchia, G. Livesey, S. Liu, A. Poli, G. Riccardi, S. Rizkalla, J. Sievenpiper, A. Trichopoulou, T. Wolever, Br J Nutr (2014), 111(2), pp. 380-382


Food intake and overweight in school-aged children in Germany: Results of the GINIplus and LISAplus studies.

Z. Pei, C. Flexeder, E. Fuertes, M. Standl, A. Buyken, D. Berdel, A. von Berg, I. Lehmann, B. Schaaf, J. Heinrich, G. and LISAplus Study Group, Ann Nutr Metab (2014), 64(1), pp. 60-70


Prospective relevance of dietary patterns at the beginning and during the course of primary school to the development of body composition

K. Diethelm, A.L.B. Günther, M.B. Schulze, M. Standl, J. Heinrich, A. Buyken, British Journal of Nutrition (2014), pp. 1488-1498

<jats:p>Primary school years seem to represent a critical period for the development of overweight and obesity. However, only a few studies have analysed the prospective relationship between dietary patterns and weight status in children. The aims of the present study were to identify dietary patterns at the beginning of and during the primary school period and to examine their relevance to the development of body composition. Nutritional and anthropometric data from 371 participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study at the beginning (ages 6 and 7 years) and end (ages 10 and 11 years) of the primary school period were used. Principal component analyses (PCA) were conducted to identify dietary patterns, which were regressed on changes in BMI and fat mass index (FMI) between ages 6 and 7 years and ages 10 and 11 years. Reduced rank regression (RRR) was used to directly extract patterns explaining variation in changes in BMI and FMI between ages 6 and 7 years and ages 10 and 11 years. PCA yielded interpretable patterns of dietary changes at the beginning of and during the primary school period, which were not related to changes in body composition. Conversely, RRR allowed identifying predictive patterns: higher baseline intakes of white bread and lower baseline intakes of whole-grain products as well as increases in the consumption of savoury snacks, sausages and cheese during primary school years independently predicted increases in BMI and FMI during the primary school period. In conclusion, selection of unfavourable carbohydrate sources at the beginning of the primary school period and increases in the consumption of processed savoury foods during primary school years may adversely affect the development of body composition during the course of primary school.</jats:p>


Dietary glycemic load, insulin load, and weight loss in obese, insulin resistant adolescents: RESIST study

G. Joslowski, J. Halim, J. Goletzke, M. Gow, M. Ho, J.C. Louie, A. Buyken, C.T. Cowell, S.P. Garnett, Clinical Nutrition (2014), pp. 89-94

DOI


Association between carbohydrate quality and inflammatory markers: systematic review of observational and interventional studies

A. Buyken, J. Goletzke, G. Joslowski, A. Felbick, G. Cheng, C. Herder, J.C. Brand-Miller, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2014), pp. 813-833

DOI


Velocities of weight, height and fat mass gain during potentially critical periods of growth are decisive for adult body composition

G. Cheng, K. Bolzenius, G. Joslowski, A.L.B. Günther, A. Kroke, J. Heinrich, A. Buyken, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2014), pp. 262-268

DOI


Increased Intake of Carbohydrates from Sources with a Higher Glycemic Index and Lower Consumption of Whole Grains during Puberty Are Prospectively Associated with Higher IL-6 Concentrations in Younger Adulthood among Healthy Individuals

J. Goletzke, A. Buyken, G. Joslowski, K. Bolzenius, T. Remer, M. Carstensen, S. Egert, U. Nöthlings, W. Rathmann, M. Roden, C. Herder, The Journal of Nutrition (2014), pp. 1586-1593

DOI


Overweight in Adolescence Can Be Predicted at Age 6 Years: A CART Analysis in German Cohorts

C. Riedel, R. von Kries, A. Buyken, K. Diethelm, T. Keil, L. Grabenhenrich, M.J. Müller, S. Plachta-Danielzik, PLoS ONE (2014), e93581

DOI


2013

Carbohydrate quality is not associated with liver enzyme activity and plasma TAG and HDL concentrations over 5 years in an older population

J. Goletzke, A. Buyken, B. Gopinath, E. Rochtchina, A.W. Barclay, G. Cheng, J.C. Brand-Miller, P. Mitchell, British Journal of Nutrition (2013), pp. 918-925

<jats:p>Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely associated with insulin resistance and obesity. Hence, carbohydrate quality could be of relevance to the risk of NAFLD, but prospective data are lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinal associations between carbohydrate quality (including dietary glycaemic index (GI) and intakes of sugar, starch and fibre) and markers of liver function in an older Australian population. The analysis was based on 866 participants ( ≥ 49 years) of the Blue Mountains Eye Study with fasting blood specimens and dietary intake data at baseline and 5-year follow-up. Multi-level mixed regression analysis was used to relate dietary GI and sugar, starch and fibre intake to the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), as well as fasting TAG and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, a lower fibre intake was cross-sectionally related to higher GGT (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>= 0·02) and fasting TAG (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>= 0·002) levels, with fruit fibre being the most relevant fibre source (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>= 0·095 for GGT; <jats:italic>P</jats:italic>= 0·003 for TAG). A higher dietary GI was associated with lower HDL-C (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>= 0·046). Changes in carbohydrate quality during 5 years were not related to changes in ALT, GGT, TAG or HDL-C (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic>≥ 0·08). In conclusion, the absence of longitudinal associations between carbohydrate quality and liver enzymes and serum lipids in this older population does not support a major role of carbohydrate nutrition in liver function among the elderly.</jats:p>


Habitually Higher Dietary Glycemic Index During Puberty Is Prospectively Related to Increased Risk Markers of Type 2 Diabetes in Younger Adulthood

J. Goletzke, C. Herder, G. Joslowski, K. Bolzenius, T. Remer, S.A. Wudy, M. Roden, W. Rathmann, A. Buyken, Diabetes Care (2013), pp. 1870-1876

DOI


Animal Protein Intakes during Early Life and Adolescence Differ in Their Relation to the Growth Hormone-Insulin-Like-Growth-Factor Axis in Young Adulthood

G. Joslowski, T. Remer, K.E. Assmann, D. Krupp, G. Cheng, S.P. Garnett, A. Kroke, S.A. Wudy, A.L.B. Günther, A. Buyken, The Journal of Nutrition (2013), pp. 1147-1154

DOI


Prospective association of protein intake during puberty with body composition in young adulthood

K. Assmann, G. Joslowski, A. Buyken, G. Cheng, T. Remer, A. Kroke, A. Günther, Obesity (2013), pp. E782-E789

DOI


Breastfeeding and Its Prospective Association with Components of the GH-IGF-Axis, Insulin Resistance and Body Adiposity Measures in Young Adulthood – Insights from Linear and Quantile Regression Analysis

A.L.B. Günther, H. Walz, A. Kroke, S.A. Wudy, C. Riedel, R. von Kries, G. Joslowski, T. Remer, G. Cheng, A. Buyken, PLoS ONE (2013), e79436

DOI


2012

[The DONALD cohort. An updated overview on 25 years of research based on the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed study].

A. Buyken, U. Alexy, M. Kersting, T. Remer, Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz (2012), 55(6-7), pp. 875-884


Body size at birth modifies the effect of fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) rs9939609 polymorphism on adiposity in adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study.

I. Labayen, J. Ruiz, F. Ortega, F. Gottrand, I. Huybrechts, J. Dallongeville, K. Widhalm, M. Ferrari, A. Buyken, M. Kersting, G. Moschonis, D. Turck, S. Gómez, M. Sjostrom, A. Meirhaeghe, L. Moreno, Br J Nutr (2012), 107(10), pp. 1498-1504


FADS1 FADS2 gene cluster, PUFA intake and blood lipids in children: results from the GINIplus and LISAplus studies.

M. Standl, E. Lattka, B. Stach, S. Koletzko, C. Bauer, A. von Berg, D. Berdel, U. Krämer, B. Schaaf, S. Röder, O. Herbarth, A. Buyken, T. Drogies, J. Thiery, B. Koletzko, J. Heinrich, G. Study Group, L. Study Group, PLoS One (2012), 7(5), pp. e37780


Long-Term Dietary Potential Renal Acid Load During Adolescence Is Prospectively Associated with Indices of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Young Women

D. Krupp, S.A. Johner, H. Kalhoff, A. Buyken, T. Remer, The Journal of Nutrition (2012), pp. 313-319

DOI


The link between dietary glycemic index and nutrient adequacy

J.C.Y. Louie, A. Buyken, J.C. Brand-Miller, V.M. Flood, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2012), pp. 694-702

DOI


Evidence-Based Guideline of the German Nutrition Society: Carbohydrate Intake and Prevention of Nutrition-Related Diseases

H. Hauner, A. Bechthold, H. Boeing, A. Brönstrup, A. Buyken, E. Leschik-Bonnet, J. Linseisen, M. Schulze, D. Strohm, G. Wolfram, Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism (2012), pp. 1-58

DOI


Is breastfeeding related to bone properties? A longitudinal analysis of associations between breastfeeding duration and pQCT parameters in children and adolescents

T. Kühn, A. Kroke, T. Remer, E. Schönau, A. Buyken, Maternal & Child Nutrition (2012), pp. 642-649

DOI


Prospective associations of dietary insulin demand, glycemic index, and glycemic load during puberty with body composition in young adulthood

G. Joslowski, J. Goletzke, G. Cheng, A.L.B. Günther, J. Bao, J.C. Brand-Miller, A. Buyken, International Journal of Obesity (2012), pp. 1463-1471

DOI


Die DONALD Kohorte

A. Buyken, U. Alexy, M. Kersting, T. Remer, Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz (2012), pp. 875-884

DOI


Increase in prevalence of adiposity between the ages of 7 and 11 years reflects lower remission rates during this period

R. von Kries, H. Reulen, O. Bayer, C. Riedel, K. Diethelm, A. Buyken, Pediatric Obesity (2012), pp. 13-20

DOI


Kohlenhydratzufuhr und Prävention ausgewählter ernährungsmitbedingter Krankheiten

H. Hauner, A. Bechthold, H. Boeing, A. Brönstrup, A. Buyken, E. Leschik-Bonnet, J. Linseisen, M. Schulze, D. Strohm, G. Wolfram, DMW - Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift (2012), pp. 389-393

DOI


Beyond overweight: nutrition as an important lifestyle factor influencing timing of puberty

G. Cheng, A. Buyken, L. Shi, N. Karaolis-Danckert, A. Kroke, S.A. Wudy, G.H. Degen, T. Remer, Nutrition Reviews (2012), pp. 133-152

DOI


2011

Direction of Associations between Added Sugar Intake in Early Childhood and Body Mass Index at Age 7 Years May Depend on Intake Levels

A. Herbst, K. Diethelm, G. Cheng, U. Alexy, A. Icks, A. Buyken, The Journal of Nutrition (2011), pp. 1348-1354

DOI


Validation of protein and potassium intakes assessed from 24 h recalls against levels estimated from 24 h urine samples in children and adolescents of Turkish descent living in Germany: results from the EVET! Study

B. Bokhof, A. Buyken, C. Doğan, A. Karaboğa, J. Kaiser, A. Sonntag, A. Kroke, Public Health Nutrition (2011), pp. 640-647

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec id="S1368980011002734_abs1" sec-type="general"><jats:title>Objective</jats:title><jats:p>Nutrition-related health problems such as obesity are frequent among children and adolescents of Turkish descent living in Germany, yet data on their dietary habits are scarce. One reason might be the lack of validated assessment tools for this target group. We therefore aimed to validate protein and K intakes from one 24 h recall against levels estimated from one 24 h urine sample in children and adolescents of Turkish descent living in Germany.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980011002734_abs2" sec-type="general"><jats:title>Design</jats:title><jats:p>Cross-sectional analyses comprised estimation of mean differences, Pearson correlation coefficients, cross-classifications and Bland–Altman plots to assess the agreement between the nutritional intake estimated from a single 24 h recall and a single 24 h urine sample collected on the previous day.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980011002734_abs3" sec-type="general"><jats:title>Setting</jats:title><jats:p>Dortmund, Germany.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980011002734_abs4" sec-type="subjects"><jats:title>Subjects</jats:title><jats:p>Data from forty-three study participants (aged 5–18 years; 26 % overweight) with a traditional Turkish background were included.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980011002734_abs5" sec-type="results"><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>The 24 h recall significantly overestimated mean protein and K intake by 10·7 g/d (95 % CI of mean difference: 0·6, 20·7 g/d) and 344 mg/d (95 % CI 8, 680 mg/d), respectively. Correlations between intake estimates were <jats:italic>r</jats:italic> = 0·25 (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·1) and 0·31 (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·05). Both methods classified 70 % and 69 % of the participants into the same/adjacent quartile of protein and K intake and misclassified 7 % and 7 %, respectively, into the opposite quartile. Bland–Altman plots indicated a wide scattering of differences in both protein and K intake.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980011002734_abs6" sec-type="conclusion"><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Among children and adolescents of traditional Turkish descent living in Germany, one 24 h recall may only be valid for categorizing subjects into high, medium or low consumers.</jats:p></jats:sec>


Associations between the macronutrient composition of the evening meal and average daily sleep duration in early childhood

K. Diethelm, T. Remer, H. Jilani, C. Kunz, A. Buyken, Clinical Nutrition (2011), pp. 640-646

DOI


Dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load among Australian children and adolescents

J. Chun Yu Louie, A. Buyken, K. Heyer, V.M. Flood, British Journal of Nutrition (2011), pp. 1273-1282

<jats:p>There are no published data regarding the overall dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) of Australian children and adolescents. We therefore aim to describe the dietary GI and GL of participants of the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2007ANCNPAS), and to identify the main foods contributing to their GL. Children, aged 2–16 years, who provided two 24 h recalls in the 2007ANCNPAS were included. A final dataset of 4184 participants was analysed. GI of each food item was assigned using a previously published method. GL was calculated, and food groups contributing to the GL were described by age group and sex. The weighted mean dietary GI and GL of the participants were 54 (<jats:sc>sd</jats:sc> 5) and 136 (<jats:sc>sd</jats:sc> 44), respectively. Among the nutrients examined, Ca had the highest inverse relationship with GI (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> &lt; 0·001), while percentage energy from starch was most positively associated with GI. The association between fibre density and GI was modest, and percentage energy from sugar had an inverse relationship with GI. Daily dietary GL contributed by energy-dense and/or nutrient-poor (EDNP) items in subjects aged 14–16 years was more than doubled that of subjects aged 2–3 years. To conclude, Australian children and adolescents were having a high-GI dietary pattern characterised by high-starchy food intake and low Ca intake. A significant proportion of their dietary GL was from EDNP foods. Efforts to reduce dietary GI and GL in children and adolescents should focus on energy-dense starchy foods.</jats:p>


Prepubertal Glucocorticoid Status and Pubertal Timing

L. Shi, S.A. Wudy, A. Buyken, C. Maser-Gluth, M.F. Hartmann, T. Remer, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (2011), pp. E891-E898

<jats:sec> <jats:title>Context:</jats:title> <jats:p>Whether prepubertal glucocorticoid status impacts on the timing of puberty is not clear.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Objective:</jats:title> <jats:p>The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between prepubertal glucocorticoid status and early or late pubertal markers, independent of adrenarchal and nutritional status.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Design and Participants:</jats:title> <jats:p>Prospective cohort study of healthy Caucasian children (n = 111, 56 boys) who provided both 24-h urine samples and weighed dietary records 1 and 2 yr before the start of pubertal growth spurt [age at take-off (ATO)].</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Measurements:</jats:title> <jats:p>Major urinary glucocorticoid and androgen metabolites determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis were summed to assess daily overall cortisol (ΣC21) and adrenal androgen secretion; urinary free cortisol and cortisone measured by RIA were summed (UFF+UFE) as an indicator of potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Main Outcomes:</jats:title> <jats:p>The main outcomes included ATO, age at peak height velocity, age at menarche/voice break, ages at Tanner stage 2 for breast (girls) and genital (boys) development, and pubic hair.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results:</jats:title> <jats:p>In girls ΣC21, but not UFF+UFE, was associated with pubertal markers after adjusting for overall adrenal androgen, urinary nitrogen, and body fat. Girls with higher ΣC21 (fourth quartile) reached ATO 0.7 yr (P = 0.01) and menarche 0.9 yr later (P = 0.006) than girls with lower ΣC21 (first quartile). The ΣC21 tended to be also positively associated with age at Tanner stage 2 for breast (P = 0.1), Tanner stage 2 for pubic hair (P = 0.1), and age at peak height velocity (P = 0.06). In boys, neither the ΣC21 nor UFF+UFE was related to pubertal timing.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusion:</jats:title> <jats:p>An individually higher prepubertal glucocorticoid secretion level, even in physiological range, appears to delay early and late pubertal timing of healthy girls, particularly their onset of pubertal growth spurt and menarche.</jats:p> </jats:sec>


Longitudinal associations between reported sleep duration in early childhood and the development of body mass index, fat mass index and fat free mass index until age 7

K. Diethelm, K. Bolzenius, G. Cheng, T. Remer, A. Buyken, International Journal of Pediatric Obesity (2011), pp. e114-e123

DOI


Consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish, and nuts and risk of inflammatory disease mortality

B. Gopinath, A. Buyken, V.M. Flood, M. Empson, E. Rochtchina, P. Mitchell, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2011), pp. 1073-1079

DOI


Association of dietary energy density in childhood with age and body fatness at the onset of the pubertal growth spurt

A.L.B. Günther, L.J. Stahl, A. Buyken, A. Kroke, British Journal of Nutrition (2011), pp. 345-349

<jats:p>The aim of the present study was to examine the association of pre-pubertal dietary energy density (ED) with both age and body fatness at the start of the pubertal growth spurt (age at take-off, ATO). Analyses included 219 DOrtmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study participants with sufficient height measurements to estimate ATO who provided 3 d weighed dietary records at baseline, i.e. 2 and 3 years before ATO (mean age 6·9 (<jats:sc>sd</jats:sc> 1·2) years). Mean energy intakes and amounts of foods/drinks consumed at baseline were derived from the records. ED (kJ/g) was calculated based on (1) all foods and drinks (ED_all), (2) foods and energy-containing drinks (ED_energy), (3) foods and milk as a drink, but no other beverages (ED_milk) and (4) foods only, solid or liquid (ED_food). Using multiple regression analyses, the association between the ED variables and ATO was investigated. Furthermore, <jats:italic>Z</jats:italic>-scores of BMI and fat mass index (FMI) at ATO were considered as outcomes to reflect body fatness at puberty onset. The results showed that ED at baseline was not associated with ATO, regardless of the ED method used. For example, mean ATO in the lowest <jats:italic>v.</jats:italic> highest tertile of ED_food was 9·3 (95 % CI 9·0, 9·5) <jats:italic>v.</jats:italic> 9·4 (95 % CI 9·1, 9·7) years, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic><jats:sub>trend</jats:sub> = 0·8 (adjusted for sex, maternal age, birth weight, dietary protein, dietary fibre, baseline BMI <jats:italic>Z</jats:italic>-score). Similarly, ED was not independently associated with BMI or FMI <jats:italic>Z</jats:italic>-score at ATO (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic><jats:sub>trend</jats:sub> = 0·3–0·9). In conclusion, dietary ED in childhood did not influence timing or body fatness at ATO in this cohort of healthy, free-living children.</jats:p>


Regional and socio-economic differences in food, nutrient and supplement intake in school-age children in Germany: results from the GINIplus and the LISAplus studies

S. Sausenthaler, M. Standl, A. Buyken, P. Rzehak, S. Koletzko, C.P. Bauer, B. Schaaf, A. von Berg, D. Berdel, M. Borte, O. Herbarth, I. Lehmann, U. Krämer, H. Wichmann, J. Heinrich, Public Health Nutrition (2011), pp. 1724-1735

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec id="S1368980010003575_abs1" sec-type="general"><jats:title>Objective</jats:title><jats:p>To describe regional differences between eastern and western Germany with regard to food, nutrient and supplement intake in 9–12-year-old children, and analyse its association with parental education and equivalent income.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980010003575_abs2" sec-type="general"><jats:title>Design</jats:title><jats:p>Data were obtained from the 10-year follow-up of the two prospective birth cohort studies – GINIplus and LISAplus. Data on food consumption and supplement intake were collected using an FFQ, which had been designed for the specific study population. Information on parental educational level and equivalent income was derived from questionnaires. Logistic regression modelling was used to analyse the effect of parental education, equivalent income and region on food intake, after adjusting for potential confounders.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980010003575_abs3" sec-type="general"><jats:title>Setting</jats:title><jats:p>Germany.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980010003575_abs4" sec-type="subjects"><jats:title>Subjects</jats:title><jats:p>A total of 3435 children aged 9–12 years.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980010003575_abs5" sec-type="results"><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Substantial regional differences in food intake were observed between eastern and western Germany. Intakes of bread, butter, eggs, pasta, vegetables/salad and fruit showed a significant direct relationship with the level of parental education after adjusting for potential confounders, whereas intakes of margarine, meat products, pizza, desserts and soft drinks were inversely associated with parental education. Equivalent income had a weaker influence on the child's food intake.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec id="S1368980010003575_abs6" sec-type="conclusion"><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Nutritional education programmes for school-age children should therefore account for regional differences and parental education.</jats:p></jats:sec>


Prevention strategies for type 2 diabetes should be based on evidence-based medical nutrition data. Reply to Uusitupa M, Lindström J, Tuomilehto J [letter]

A. Buyken, P. Mitchell, A. Ceriello, J. Brand-Miller, Diabetologia (2011), pp. 2471-2472

DOI


The glycemic index issue

J. Brand-Miller, A. Buyken, Current Opinion in Lipidology (2011), pp. 62-67

DOI


2010

Validation of protein intake assessed from weighed dietary records against protein estimated from 24 h urine samples in children, adolescents and young adults participating in the Dortmund Nutritional and Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study

B. Bokhof, A.L. Günther, G. Berg-Beckhoff, A. Kroke, A. Buyken, Public Health Nutrition (2010), pp. 826-834

DOI


Trends in dietary carbohydrate quality during puberty from 1988 to 2007: a cause for concern?

G. Cheng, L. Libuda, N. Karaolis-Danckert, U. Alexy, K. Bolzenius, T. Remer, A. Buyken, British Journal of Nutrition (2010), pp. 1375-1383

<jats:p>The extent to which the quality of dietary carbohydrates (CHO) changes throughout puberty is not known. We analysed trends in the quantity and quality of CHO intake among German adolescents by separately examining trends during puberty (pubertal trends) and trends in CHO intake from 1988 to 2007 (secular trends). Linear mixed-effects regression analyses were performed in 216 participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study who had provided weighed 3 d dietary records at the onset of the pubertal growth spurt (defined by age at take-off) and over the subsequent 4 years. Over the course of puberty, CHO quality changed little: added sugar intake from beverages increased in girls (0·25 (<jats:sc>se</jats:sc> 0·12) % energy (% E)/year, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·04) and added sugar intake from sweets decreased in both sexes (boys: − 0·22 (<jats:sc>se</jats:sc> 0·11) % E/year, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·049; girls: − 0·20 (<jats:sc>se</jats:sc> 0·10) % E/year, <jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·04). For both sexes, significant upward secular trends were observed for CHO (% E), glycaemic load (g/MJ) and added sugar intakes from sources other than sweets and soft drinks (% E), while absolute fibre intake (g/d) decreased (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> ≤ 0·04). Concomitant increases in total added sugar intake (% E) and decreases in fibre and whole-grain densities (g/MJ) (<jats:italic>P</jats:italic> = 0·001–0·02) were confined to boys only. The quality of dietary CHO consumed by healthy German adolescents shows notable secular declines, but does not change markedly during puberty. Public health initiatives should be tailored to improve the overall quality of CHO nutrition.</jats:p>


Relation of isoflavones and fiber intake in childhood to the timing of puberty

G. Cheng, T. Remer, R. Prinz-Langenohl, M. Blaszkewicz, G.H. Degen, A. Buyken, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2010), pp. 556-564

DOI


Carbohydrate nutrition and inflammatory disease mortality in older adults

A. Buyken, V. Flood, M. Empson, E. Rochtchina, A.W. Barclay, J. Brand-Miller, P. Mitchell, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2010), pp. 634-643

DOI


Longitudinal Associations between Endogenous Melatonin Production and Reported Sleep Duration from Childhood to Early Adulthood

K. Diethelm, L. Libuda, K. Bolzenius, B. Griefahn, A. Buyken, T. Remer, Hormone Research in Paediatrics (2010), pp. 390-398

DOI


Die maximale Anzahl anzuzeigender Publikationen wurde erreicht - alle Publikationen finden Sie im Research Infomation System.

Liste im Research Information System öffnen

Die Universität der Informationsgesellschaft